Salisbury, North CarolinaFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Salisbury, North Carolina
City

[Official seal of Salisbury, North Carolina]
Seal

[Location of Salisbury, North Carolina]
Location of Salisbury, North Carolina
Coordinates: 35°40′6″N 80°28′43″W / 35.66833°N 80.47861°W / 35.66833; -80.47861Coordinates: 35°40′6″N 80°28′43″W / 35.66833°N 80.47861°W / 35.66833; -80.47861
Country United States
State North Carolina
County Rowan
Area
 • Total 17.8 sq mi (46.0 km2)
 • Land 17.8 sq mi (46.0 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 791 ft (241 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 33,663
 • Density 1,488.3/sq mi (574.7/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 28144-28147
Area code(s) 704,980
FIPS code 37-58860[1]
GNIS feature ID 0994186[2]
Website www.salisburync.gov

Salisbury /ˈsɔːlzbəri/ SAULZ-ber-ee is a city in and the county seat of Rowan County, North Carolina.[3] The population was 33,663 in the 2010 Census (growing 27.8% from the previous Census in 2000). Salisbury is the home to famed North Carolina soft drink, Cheerwine, regional supermarket Food Lion, and the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association. It is one of only two cities in North Carolina to have gigabit capacity through its municipally-owned broadband system Fibrant.[4][5]

Contents

 [hide] 

1 Historic sites
2 Geography
3 Demographics
4 Historic engagement
5 Shopping
6 Cultural arts community
7 Health care
8 Economy
9 Education

9.1 Rowan–Salisbury School System
9.2 Private schools
9.3 Colleges and universities
9.4 Libraries
9.5 Government

10 Transportation
11 Media
12 Notable people
13 See also
14 References
15 External links

Historic sites[edit]

Salisbury has developed a strong record of historic preservation over the last few decades. It is the site of a noted prisoner of war camp during the American Civil War and has ten National Register historic districts. The city has many historic homes and commercial buildings dating from the 19th century and early 20th century, several of which are individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[6]

They include the: Bernhardt House, Boyden High School, Brooklyn-South Square Historic District, Maxwell Chambers House, Community Building, Eastover, Ellis Street Graded School Historic District, Fulton Heights Historic District, Griffith-Sowers House, Grimes Mill, Grubb-Sigmon-Weisiger House, Hambley-Wallace House, Archibald Henderson Law Office, J. C. Price High School, Kesler Manufacturing Co.-Cannon Mills Co. Plant No. 7 Historic District, Livingstone College Historic District, Napoleon Bonaparte McCanless House, Walter McCanless House, McNeely-Strachan House, Monroe Street School, Mount Zion Baptist Church, North Long Street-Park Avenue Historic District, North Main Street Historic District, Salisbury Historic District, Salisbury National Cemetery, Salisbury Railroad Corridor Historic District, Salisbury Southern Railroad Passenger Depot, Shaver Rental Houses District, John Steele House, and Calvin H. Wiley School are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[7][8][9]

Geography[edit]

Salisbury is located at WikiMiniAtlas
35°40′6″N 80°28′43″W / 35.66833°N 80.47861°W / 35.66833; -80.47861 (35.668289, -80.478479).[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 17.8 square miles (46 km2), all of it land.Rowan County Courthouse, Salisbury, 1934
Child laborer in Salisbury, 1908. Photo by Lewis Hine.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2010, there were 33,663 people, 10,276 households, and 6,186 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,488.3 people per square mile (574.6/km²). There were 11,288 housing units at an average density of 634.9 per square mile (245.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 57.30% White, 37.56% African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.39% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.92% from other races, and 1.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.30% of the population. As of 2011, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Salisbury reached a diversity milestone: the new racial makeup of the city is now only 48.6% non-Hispanic White, with other ethnicities comprising the majority 51.4% of Salisbury's population.[11]

There were 10,276 households out of which 26.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 17.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 34.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the city the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 13.1% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,923, and the median income for a family was $41,108. Males had a median income of $31,149 versus $25,019 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,864. About 12.2% of families and 16.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.3% of those under age 18 and 11.0% of those age 65 or over. 2010 Census data will be available in January 2011.

Historic engagement[edit]

The Maxwell Chambers House was built in 1820.

A walking tour begins at the Rowan County Convention and Visitor's Bureau and winds through the history of Salisbury and the state's Piedmont Region. Structures from the 19th century, as well as artifacts, such as the desk that President Andrew Jackson used when he studied law in Salisbury, are viewable. The Rowan Museum, located in both the Salisbury's 1854 Courthouse and the circa 1815 Utzman-Chambers House Museum, as well as the 1820 Hall House, provide information regarding Historic Salisbury. The City of Salisbury currently has 10 National Register Historic Districts with over 1,200 contributing properties.

Downtown Salisbury, Inc. and the Salisbury Community Appearance Commission offer a glimpse into the city's history through the Salisbury History and Art Trail. A series of markers throughout the city incorporate both history and art into the trail to assist in sharing events, stories, and experiences from Salisbury's past. The markers are organized info five broad historic eras.

Shopping[edit]

Salisbury, North Carolina is home to a vibrant downtown area that encompasses several blocks near the intersection of Innes Street and Main Street. The downtown area is dominated by small locally owned merchants.

Downtown Salisbury also provides an array of shops, antique stores, and cultural attractions. Downtown Nights Out, held from time to time throughout the year, provide opportunities for late night shopping, musical entertainment, and fine dining.

Cultural arts community[edit]

The Salisbury community presents an area rich in cultural resources with tremendous citizen support and stewardship for arts and cultural development. Salisbury boasts a tradition of valuing arts and diligently strives to protect existing resources while linking arts and cultural resources to key economic, neighborhood development, educational, and social goals of the broader community.[12]

Salisbury is characterized by a strong commitment to historic preservation, high levels of arts and cultural activity, a citizen base that places high value on arts education, and a strong local tradition of civic volunteerism. The city offers a growing population of professional and amateur artists drawn from many disciplines with vast support from local patrons and foundations.[12]

A unique participation and support for the arts, coupled with that of an emerging downtown public art program, have provided Salisbury with a stable foundation for an exemplary cultural arts plan.[12] The Salisbury Sculpture Show is an example of an existing public art program.

The local Rowan Arts Council offers a Rowan Art Crawl on the second Saturday of each month and provides access to more than 25 professional artists, studios, and galleries.

The Rail Walk Arts District, located near the restored Salisbury railroad depot, provides an array of artists and galleries.

The Waterworks Visual Arts Center provides diverse opportunities in the arts through exhibitions, education, and outreach programs.

The Salisbury Symphony Orchestra offers an opportunity to experience the joy and excitement of music.

The Piedmont Players Theatre, The Looking Glass Collective Black Box Theater, and The Norvell Children's Theater provide venues for creative community engagement through the performing arts.

The Fisher Street area of Downtown Salisbury, recently bricked and revitalized for use as an entertainment venue, has become the site for numerous outdoor concerts, special attractions, and holiday events. Brick Street Live, an outdoor summer concert series, takes place in Downtown Salisbury at the corner of Fisher and Lee Streets. The series offers performances by artists from diverse genres.

Health care[edit]

Novant Health Rowan Medical Center and affiliated doctors' offices provide a majority of the city residents' healthcare. The W.G. (Bill) Hefner VA Medical Center is a veterans' hospital in Salisbury operated by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.

Economy[edit]

Major employers in Salisbury include the headquarters of Food Lion, a regional grocery chain that is one of the US subsidiaries of Delhaize,[13] Delhaize USA, Bottom Dollar Food (Delhaize subsidiary), Bloom (Delhaize subsidiary),[14] the W.G. (Bill) Hefner VA Medical Center, the City of Salisbury and the County of Rowan. Rowan Regional Medical Center and the Rowan Salisbury School System, are also major employers. Smaller employers include textile mills and other manufacturing businesses.[citation needed]

Education[edit]

Salisbury High School

Salisbury has a number of educational institutions, both public and private.

Rowan–Salisbury School System[edit]

Main article: Rowan–Salisbury School System

The Rowan–Salisbury School System was formed in 1989 after the merger of the Rowan County Schools and the Salisbury City Schools.[15] Most notable is Salisbury High School. There are no charter schools in Rowan County.[16]

Private schools[edit]

Many private schools, both inside and outside the city of Salisbury, serve its citizens.

North Hills Christian School (PK-12)
Rockwell Christian School (PK-12)
RCHSA, Homeschool group (any age)
Sacred Heart Catholic School (K-8)
Salisbury Academy (PK-8)
Salisbury Adventist School (K-7)
Salisbury Christian School (K-12)
St. John's Kindergarten (PK-K)

Colleges and universities[edit]

Catawba College
Livingstone College
Rowan–Cabarrus Community College
Hood Theological Seminary

Libraries[edit]

Rowan Public Library (Headquarters Branch)

Government[edit]

On the national level, Salisbury is a part of North Carolina's 12th congressional district, and is currently represented by Democrat Alma Adams.[17] The state's senior member of the United States Senate is Republican Richard Burr, who was elected to the Senate in 2004. The junior Senator is Democrat Kay Hagan, who defeated Salisbury native and incumbent Senator Elizabeth Dole in the 2008 election.

On the state level, Salisbury is represented in the North Carolina House of Representatives as a part of the 77th district, which includes the city and northern and western parts of Rowan County. The current representative is Republican Harry J. Warren. Salisbury is also represented in the North Carolina Senate by Republican Andrew Brock as a part of the 34th district. Senator Brock also represents Davie County.

Salisbury is governed by a city council which is chaired by the mayor, Paul Woodson. The other city council members include: mayor pro tempore Maggie Blackwell, William "Pete" Kennedy, Karen Alexander, and Brian Miller.[18] The city council appoints a city manager to run the day-to-day operations.[19] — W. Lane Bailey was appointed as City Manager February 18,2015. [20]Since 2011, the City of Salisbury's financial foundation has been strengthened due to management's actions, which resulted in two credit rating increases to bring the city to a AA rating.[21]

Transportation[edit]

Amtrak's Crescent and Carolinian and Piedmont trains connect Salisbury with the cities of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Atlanta, Birmingham and New Orleans. The Amtrak station is situated at Depot and Liberty Streets. Salisbury is also served by Interstate 85, US Highways 601, 29, 52, and 70, and the Rowan County Airport.

Salisbury is an important point on Interstate 85 as it is just south of the halfway point between Charlotte and Greensboro. Exits 74 (Julian Road), 75 (US Highway 601/Jake Alexander Boulevard), and 76 (Innes Street/US Highway 52) are designated as Salisbury exits.

The City of Salisbury's Transit System provides public transportation and offers three routes. Each route arrives and departs from "the Transfer Site", which is located on Depot Street. Any member of the general public may ride the Salisbury Transit bus. Salisbury Transit does not operate on Sundays and some holidays.

Media[edit]

The Salisbury Post, founded in 1905, is the local daily newspaper.

WSAT, "Memories 1280", is an AM radio station whose programming consists largely of pop music "standards". It also broadcasts games of the Carolina Panthers, Catawba College, and local high schools.

WSTP is an AM station whose primary objective is to train Catawba College students for broadcasting careers.

ACCESS16 is a government access channel on located on Fibrant (the city's fiber optic telephone, Internet and MVPD service) and Time Warner Cable Salisbury (channel 16) but not available by satellite. It serves Rowan County, including Salisbury, Granite Quarry, Rockwell, Faith, China Grove and Cleveland.

Salisbury receives its television stations from the Charlotte TV market.

Notable people[edit]

Bill Baker (1911–2006), MLB player[22]
Rachel Oestreicher Bernheim (born 1943), Human rights activist
Sidney Blackmer (1895–1973), Actor
George Bradshaw (1924–1994), Major League Baseball catcher for the 1952 Washington Senators
Rufus Early Clement (1900–1967), African American educator
Elizabeth Dole (born 1936), United States Senator 2003–2009
Mike Evans (1949–2006), Actor and co-creator of the show Good Times
James Goodnight (born 1943), CEO of SAS Institute
Josephine D. Heard (1861 – c. 1921), African American teacher, poet
Archibald Henderson (1877–1963), Professor of mathematics who wrote on many subjects
Tripp Isenhour (born 1968), Professional golfer
Bobby Jackson (born 1973), National Basketball Association player
Artemus James (born Andrew Shane Crawford), Musician
Roland Jones (1813–1869), Represented Louisiana in the United States House of Representatives from 1853–1855
E. J. Junior (born 1959), National Football League linebacker 1981–1993
Clyde Kluttz (1917–1979), MLB player, executive and scout
Susan W. Kluttz, Secretary of North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources and former longest serving mayor of Salisbury.[23]
Daniel Newnan (1780–1851), Politician and physician
Bobby Parnell (born 1984), MLB pitcher for the New York Mets
Lucius E. Polk (1833–1892), Brigadier general in the Confederate States Army
Christian Reid (real name Frances Fisher Tiernan, 1846–1920), Author of novels including The Land of the Sky
Jay Ritchie (born 1936), MLB pitcher
Julian Robertson (born 1932), Financier and philanthropist

See also[edit]

Salisbury Township
The Salisbury District

References[edit]

^ Jump up to: a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
Jump up ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
Jump up ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
Jump up ^ http://www.muninetworks.org/tags-95
Jump up ^ http://www.salisburypost.com/article/20140703/SP01/140709915/0/SEARCH&slId=4
Jump up ^ "Historic Preservation". City of Salisbury, North Carolina. Retrieved 24 December 2011. 
Jump up ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
Jump up ^ "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 1/24/11 through 1/28/11. National Park Service. 2011-02-04. 
Jump up ^ "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties. National Park Service. 2014-05-30. 
Jump up ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
Jump up ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/37/3758860.html
^ Jump up to: a b c Salisbury Cultural Action Plan Executive Summary, Mary Berryman Agard, & Associates, 2008 July. Retrieved 2010-08-05
Jump up ^ "Customer Service." Food Lion. Retrieved on May 17, 2012. "CORPORATE ADDRESS Food Lion, LLC. P.O. Box 1330 Salisbury, NC 28145-1330"
Jump up ^ "Contacts." Delhaize Group. Retrieved on May 17, 2012. "DELHAIZE GROUP U.S. P.O. Box 1330, 2110 Executive Drive Salisbury NC 28145-1330 United States" and "FOOD LION, BLOOM & BOTTOM DOLLAR FOOD P.O. Box 1330, 2110 Executive Drive Salisbury NC 28145-1330 - U.S.A. "
Jump up ^ Campbell, Sarah (1 July 2011). "Developer offers plans for central office downtown for schools". Salisbury Post. Retrieved 26 October 2011. 
Jump up ^ "Rowan County". Office of Charter Schools website. North Carolina Dept. of Public Instruction. Retrieved 25 February 2012. 
Jump up ^ http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Alma_Adams
Jump up ^ Ford, Emily (7 December 2011). "Woodson takes gavel as new Salisbury mayor". Salisbury Post. Retrieved 18 December 2011. 
Jump up ^ http://www.salisburypost.com/article/20140618/SP01/140619714/0/SEARCH&slId=20
Jump up ^ http://www.salisburypost.com/2015/02/18/salisbury-city-council-hires-seasoned-city-manager/
Jump up ^ "S&P upgrades city’s bond rating again | Salisbury, NC". Salisbury Post. 2013-11-01. Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
Jump up ^ London, Mike (April 17, 2006). "Mike London column: Local legend played in World Series". Salisbury Post. Retrieved September 12, 2012. 
Jump up ^ Ford, Emily (March 17, 2012). "Susan Kluttz reflects on her tenure". Salisbury Post. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Salisbury, North Carolina.

Official website
Salisbury Post
Salisbury-Rowan County Visitor's Bureau
Salisbury Prison (Civil War) web site
Historic Salisbury web site
Rowan Museum web site
The Salisbury Murders and Lynching
Downtown Salisbury, Inc.
Transparency in Rowan County and Municipalities

[show]

v
t
e

Municipalities and communities of Rowan County, North Carolina, United States
County seat: Salisbury
Cities

Kannapolis‡
Salisbury

Towns

China Grove
Cleveland
East Spencer
Faith
Granite Quarry
Landis
Rockwell
Spencer

Townships

Atwell
China Grove
Cleveland
Franklin
Gold Hill
Litaker
Locke
Morgan
Mount Ulla
Providence
Salisbury
Scotch Irish
Steele
Unity

CDP

Enochville

Unincorporated
communities

Bostian Heights
Dogwood Acres
Dukeville
Gold Hill
Woodleaf

Footnotes
‡This populated place also has portions in an adjacent county or counties

[show]

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e

Charlotte Metropolitan Area

[hide] 
Counties

Alexander¶
Anson¶
Cabarrus
Catawba¶
Chester
Chesterfield¶
Cleveland‡
Gaston
Iredell
Lancaster
Lincoln
Mecklenburg
Rowan
Stanly‡
Union
York

[hide] 
Major city

Charlotte

[hide] 
Municipalities and CDPs in the Charlotte Metropolitan Area

50k–100k

Concord
Gastonia
Huntersville
Rock Hill

20k–50k

Cornelius
Hickory¶
Indian Trail
Kannapolis
Matthews
Mint Hill
Monroe
Mooresville
Salisbury
Shelby‡
Statesville

5k–20k

Albemarle‡
Belmont
Bessemer City
Cheraw¶
Cherryville
Chester
Conover¶
Davidson
Fort Mill
Harrisburg
Kings Mountain
Lake Norman of Catawba¶
Lancaster
Lincolnton
Mount Holly
Newton
Pageland¶
Pineville
South Gastonia
St. Stephens¶
Unionville
Wadesboro¶
Waxhaw
Weddington
Wesley Chapel
York

Footnotes

Bold = principal metro cities
‡ = places and counties part of CSA
¶ = sometimes included in metropolitan

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